Monthly Archives: July 2015

Straight-Leg Pants Pattern

This pattern is designed for a belly-button typed 11.5″ Barbie doll, but it also fits the older narrow-hipped dolls fairly well. It should fit most of the different Barbie doll body types if you take care when knitting the top half of the pants and cast off with enough slack.

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Supplies:

– Size 10 Crochet Thread
– Size 0 (2.00 mm) Knitting Needles
– Size 0 (2.00 mm) Cable Holder OR an extrea Size 0 (2.00 mm) Knitting Needle

Here are a few notes before you begin:
– This pattern can be modified for length – you can easily subtract rows for a better fit for a Skipper or Disney doll.
– Slip the first stitch of every row for a nicer edge that sews together better than a rough non-slip stitched edge.
– k2p2 is optional as you cast off; I didn’t notice a big difference in the finished product between only knitting the cast off row and alternating that row between knits and purls to match the previous rows.

Abbreviations:
P – Purl Stitch
K – Knit Stitch
k2p2 – two knit stitches followed by two purl stitches; repeat this pattern through the end of the row
p2k2 – two purl stitches followed by two knit stitches; repeat this pattern through the end of the row
Stockinette Stitch – A technique where you knit one row and pearl the next row to make a smooth piece of fabric
K2tog – Knit 2 stitches together

– Leg (Make 2) –

Row 1: Cast on 28 stitches

Rows 2-71: Stockinette stitch (knit one row, purl the next) for 70 rows, beginning with a knit row (28 stitches)

Row 72: Cast off 2, knit remaining row (26 stitches)

Row 73: Cast off 2, purl remaining row (24 stitches)

Row 74: Cast off 1, knit remaining row (23 stitches)

Row 75: Cast off 1, purl remaining row (22 stitches)

DO NOT cast off – once this leg is finished, place it on a cable holder or set the needle aside while you stitch the second leg
DO cut the thread and leave a tail on the first leg so that your thread is available to work on the second leg – the second leg does not require the thread to be cut – you can move on to create the top without cutting the thread on the second leg

– Top –

Row 76: Knit 21 on the second leg, join the final stitch of the second leg with the first stitch of the first leg with a k2tog, knit 21 on the first leg (make sure that you keep the right and wrong sides of the fabric on each leg facing the same direction – the fabric created by stockinette stitch has a front and a back and it will not look right if one is backwards) (43 stitches)

Rows 77-79: stockinette stitch for 3 rows (43 stitches)

Row 80: K10, k2tog, k8, k2tog, k9, k2tog, k10 (40 stitches)

Rows 81-85: stockinette for 5 rows (40 stitches)

Row 86: K12, k2tog, k12, k2tog, k12 (38 stitches)

Rows 87-89: stockinette for 3 rows (38 stitches)

Row 90: K11, k2tog, k12, k2tog, k11 (36 stitches)

Row 91: k2p2 (36 stitches)

Row 92: p2k2 (36 stitches)

Row 93: k2p2 (36 stitches)

Row 94: p2k2 (36 stitches)

Row 95: Cast off (do this loosely so that the top has some stretch – do not repeat my mistake)

– Finishing –

Finish the pattern by sewing the seams together. I find that it is easiest to sew the back of the top from top to bottom first, and then work your way down both legs. It is easier to work from the top down because then you won’t end up with uneven ends in the crotch area. It is much easier to regulate the stretch of the fabric as you work down the legs, and you can adjust it as needed to keep it even. The hardest part things in this pattern to sew is the crotch area, so make sure to take your time so that you don’t sew the wrong edges together. Once the pants are sewn together and you have worked in any loose ends, your doll will have a sweet new pair of slacks.

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That is it! Once you complete these steps, you will be in possession of a lovely pair of straight-leg Ood pants. I am happy that I was able to share this with everybody. I look forward to sharing the Ood Mask pattern with you all once it has been perfected.

This is my original pattern and protected by copyright law. These instructions may not be duplicated, distributed, or sold in any form. You are welcome to create and sell the items that you make using this pattern; I kindly ask that you link back to my blog if you do so. If you make this pattern, please let me know! I would love to see your work, and I will update the pattern as needed with the feedback given.

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Ood Pants, Take 3

Finally! Something Ood! This is long over-due, but I finally bit the bullet and got pictures taken of the Ood pants. I know they don’t look great because the lighting here leaves much to be desired, but I’m going to go with it for now. For the next few weeks we will just have to make due with what I have available (the joy of moving!). So, on to the pants!

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Where to begin with these…. It feels like I’ve been working on them for ages. Looking back at the blog, that seems painfully accurate. I remember that when I first started them, just as an experiment, I tried to make this pattern in the round with my set of metal double pointed needles (DPNs). While this technique can work with larger sized yarn, it doesn’t work well with crochet thread. The problem I ran into was that the slack between DPNs didn’t get absorbed back into the surrounding stitches as I was knitting. This caused large holes in the sides, which was not aesthetically pleasing. I suppose I will reserve that technique for larger gauge yarns and stick with the regular way of making doll pants. Because that experiment didn’t go well, I made these pants with regular single pointed needles and sewed it together at the end. I found that slipping a stitch at the end makes the edges much easier to work with. I made sure to note that in the pattern, too.

Once I got started with my regular needles, I ran into a few other problems. I finished the first leg, I set it aside, and my daughter found it. As any toddler would, she started waving the needle in the air and pulling at the string, so it was pulled entirely apart by the time I got home. This happened while her father was in charge, but it was ultimately my fault for not putting them somewhere toddler-proof. I had to start it over again after that setback because of how unevenly it had unraveled. Luckily, I didn’t have any other toddler-related incidents after that. I did have a bit of trouble when we were packing and moving, though. At one point, my work was misplaced and I feared it was in a box destined for the moving truck. Luckily, it surfaced before anything happened, but it was frustrating not having it to work on for those days.

These pants used up almost all of the black thread on its skein. I have a few yards left on it when I was finished, but I was worried about running out as I knit the second leg. Luckily, skeins of crochet thread have a deceivingly large amount of thread on them even when they look barren. On that same note, something cool happened just after I finished this garment. I was at a thrift store with my mom and she I found a skein of black yarn! Same gauge that I use for my doll clothes and only cost $1. Forget lottery tickets, my luck guides me to cool thrift store finds. It may be a little thing, but I’ll take it.

I created the pattern for these pants. I didn’t like the look of various patterns I found online because they were too form fitting, so I had to make the pattern myself to fit the Ood aesthetic. I went for a straight-leg pant that went down to the doll’s ankle. My first draft needed some tweaks, and the adjustments resulted in exactly what I wanted. The biggest changes I did was lengthening the legs and adjusting the rows around the waist. In this picture, the first draft is on the left and the finished product is on the right.

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Here is a link to the pattern. It is a fairly straightforward method, and I hope you enjoy it! I look forward to when I make another pair for the second Ood doll. Before I start on that, though, I am going to make the jacket for this doll. I have been browsing the Sticka till Barbie website, and I found a few promising patterns. I will try my hand at one or two of them and go from there. Once that is done, it is just a matter of making shoes, gloves, and a brain for this Ood to be complete. It seems like a lot more when I write it down. Wow.

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I think she is looking better every day! For me, the biggest difference came when I cut her hair so that the mask would fit better. All she needs is a proper Ood shirt and the whole look will really pull together. Keep an eye out! Next week I will talk about some of the stuff that we found in my mom’s attic. We also just found a box in the basement with some gems, but they may be ruined. Some items were in a plastic box in the basement, and the basement flooded when the water heater broke. The box is covered in mud, but everything inside is relatively clean. The items are dry and not moldy, but they smell terrible. I am going to let them sit out for a week and then I will clean them. From there, I’ll decide if they’re worth keeping or if I have to let go of a fascinating flash from my past. I’m sure I will write about it either way, so we have that going for us. Anyways…. I adore you all and hope you have a fantastic week.

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Filed under Barbie Who?