To Give an Ood a Haircut

Ahhh! I think I fell into some type of worm hole. Or maybe I went on an adventure with the Doctor…. Because there is absolutely no way it’s been nearly a month since I’ve posted. Wow. I am so sorry that I’ve been terrible about posting lately. Moving has been kicking my butt and presented some struggles that really put me off kilter. In addition, the baby caught scarlet fever. Now, I know what you’re thinking: “Isn’t that one of those diseases from the Oregon Trail video game that people don’t get anymore?” Except they can. And we did. As you can see, I have been busy and completely lost track of time. I will do my best to be more consistent. I promise!

For today, I am going to dive into prepping the body and hair of the first Ood doll. I’ve found many dolls since beginning this project, and all of them are second-hand. As one can expect, some of them are in better condition than others. This doll has a pristine body but problems with her hair. I believe my daughter pulled out her hair, and it is very visible how much is missing behind her bangs.  Because of this, she needs an extra bit of TLC to completed her transformation. Her body needs a good scrub and she needs a haircut so that the mask will fit properly over her head. Once these changes are made, she will be a few steps closer to joining the Oodkind.

This doll has a general layer of grime on her body and a few random marks on her legs. The grime didn’t show well on the pictures I took, so you’ll just have to take my word on this one! To restore her, I used water and regular blue Dawn dish soap. Most of the work was done with a microfiber cloth, but I used a cotton swab for her face to get all the nooks and crannies. Although the transformation isn’t dramatic, it is an important step to take. A clean doll is less likely to develop stains on its plastic and it also prevents the transfer grime to the clothes I’m making for her. After letting her air dry overnight, she was ready for her haircut.

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As a child, I never gave my dolls haircuts. I just wasn’t that kid; it upset me deeply when anything happened to my dolls. My sister didn’t feel the same way, though. I vividly remember her cutting the hair of her dolls and blowing one up with firecrackers on the Fourth of July. Luckily, she always stayed away from my dolls. Still, I can’t help but think her actions scarred me because I had a fairly queasy feeling as I cut this doll’s hair.

My method for cutting the doll’s hair was simple. First, I combed out her hair and secured it with a plastic band near her head. Then I secured a second plastic band further down her hair.

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Then I made the cut!

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Next, I removed the plastic band and combed the hair back to a more natural position.

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Last, I trimmed the hair to even it out on the sides.

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This method is less precise than free-style cutting, but I am not overly concerned with how the haircut looks because she will be wearing a mask. I used this method instead of free-styling the scissors in order to reduce the mess caused by a haircut. The plastic band prevented the hair from going everywhere as I cut it. I did have a bit of a problem with the little hairs while trimming, but the small hairs were easily swallowed up by my handheld vacuum. The longer strands wouldn’t have gone down as easily. I suggest doing this over a garbage bin or outside if possible. I also suggest going slowly. I tried to rush, and that caused some unevenness in the back.

Now that her hair is more manageable, the mask fits over her head. I can now properly fit the prototype Ood mask over her head without her locks popping out the back. It is an awesome sight, and I feel silly for not having done this sooner.

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I am fairly happy with the design, but I do see a few tweaks that I’d like to make for the second mask. The fitting around the neck needs some changes to better fit her shape. Right now, the neck is too loose and the length concerns me. Overall, as a first draft, it turned out very well. Everything can be changed in the pattern for the final draft. I am very pleased with this prototype and how well it looks now that I can lace it up.

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That is it for today! I hope you enjoyed my rambling on about cleaning this doll and cutting her hair. I am still working on the pants. Long story short, the baby managed to ruin the nearly completed pants I had been working on all this time. She also destroyed what was left of my black crochet thread. It was heartbreaking; it takes so many hours to knit those tiny things. I bought a new skein of it last week and I’ve been diligently working on finishing the pants. I currently have one leg finished and the other one started, so it has been going fairly quickly. Hopefully I can keep the momentum up as we approach the big moving day! I can’t wait for this all to be over. Nothing makes you appreciate normal, boring life quite like moving. I want to spend my time crafting, not packing.

Beyond all of that, I am considering what footwear my Ood will wear. They appear to wear black utility boots in the episodes that I have seen, but I’m not sure if I can emulate that well. I think I will browse patterns and see what I can come up with. If I can’t find anything knit/crochet that catches my eye, I am considering dabbling into polymer clay to create the shoes I want. I’m not entirely sure that I want to take that dive, though. Clay gets messy and I don’t have the smaller shaping tools needed for the fine detailing. Plus, after the molding, it would need some paint for highlights and more detailing…. It just seems daunting. This is why I’m looking into my various options before I go down that road. I am confident that I can find something that will work, so stay tuned! I hope you all have a fantastic day.

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2 Comments

Filed under Barbie Who?

2 responses to “To Give an Ood a Haircut

  1. Don’t apologise. Moving house and Scarlet Fever are a lot to cope with. I’m sure an adventure with the Doctor would have been more fun, although probably more dangerous 🙂

Geronimo!

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